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Romaine lettuce is not safe to eat, CDC warns

An estimated 265,000 people report suffering from E. coli infections each year in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Romaine lettuce is unsafe to eat in any form, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday in a food safety alert in response to a new outbreak of illnesses caused by a particularly dangerous type of E. coli bacteria.

The CDC told consumers to throw away any romaine lettuce they may already have purchased. Restaurants should not serve it, stores should not sell it, and people should not buy it, no matter where or when the lettuce was grown. It does not matter if it is chopped, whole head or part of a mix.
 
 
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HALF OF ADULTS DO ZERO EXERCISE

Almost half of US adults are couch potatoes managing absolutely no exercise, a new study has shown. Using data from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), researchers found that a quarter of adults sit for more than eight hours per day and one in 10 are physically inactive. In fact, just 2.6 percent of the population sits for less than four hours a day.

Almost half of US adults are couch potatoes managing absolutely no exercise, a new study has shown. Using data from the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), researchers found that a quarter of adults sit for more than eight hours per day and one in 10 are physically inactive. In fact, just 2.6 percent of the population sits for less than four hours a day.

Lack of exercise and being sedentary are both well-known to increase the risk of several health problems including diabetes, heart disease and cancer. The team, led by the University of Pennsylvania, says understanding the prevalence of these behaviors could help doctors determine whether to prioritize interventions focusing on sedentary time, physical activity or both.

 
 
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RUTGERS UNIVERSITY WITHDRAWS PUNISHMENT FOR PROFESSOR WHO SAID HE HATES WHITE PEOPLE

Rutgers University has withdrawn its punishment for a history professor who said he officially hates white people, absolving him of blame for violating the institutions discrimination and harassment policy.

Back in May, James Livingston posted on Facebook and Twitter that he officially hates white people following a visit to a cafe where he encountered little Caucasian a holes who know their parents will approve of anything they do. Livingston subsequently asserted that he would resign from his race, writing, Do what you want, nobody here is gonna restrict your right to be white. I hereby resign from my race. F@$# these people. Yeah, I know it is about access to my dinner. F$#@ you, too.

After the university was alerted to numerous complaints about the purported racist content of the posts, its investigation concluded that Livingston had damaged the institutions reputation, releasing a statement which said, Given Professor Livingstons insistence on making disparaging racial comments, a reasonable student may have concerns that he or she would be stigmatized in his classes because of his or her race. However, following an appeal by Livingston, who was represented by the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE), a civil liberties advocacy group, Rutgers reversed the decision.

 
 
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KEY TO WEIGHT LOSS: STEP ON SCALE EVERY DAY

Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing and University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine found that routinely monitoring body weight not only keeps goals in the front of the mind, but it allows a person to recognize the patterns that are working. That is, when a change in diet, fitness, or other lifestyle habit occurs, literally watching your weight can help you see what is most effective.

For the study, the authors looked at data from 1,042 mostly middle-aged adults participating in the Health eHeart study, a long-term project out of the University of California, San Francisco. Participants are tasked with self-reporting health data, including pulse, sleep totals, blood pressure, and of course, weight.

Researchers specifically looked at how frequently participants weighed themselves and compared it to their weight at the end of the 12 month period. They discovered that participants who weighed themselves six to seven times a week showed the most significant weight loss at the end of the year, shedding about 1.7 percent of their weight on average.